Deputy pleads guilty in jailhouse food tampering

COLUMBUS, Ohio (AP) — A former Ohio deputy accused of feeding an inmate a bologna sandwich that been rubbed against another inmate’s genitals has pleaded guilty to two health code violations. In a Columbus courtroom on Wednesday, 38-year-old Joseph Cantwell also apologized for the shame and embarrassment that he said he had caused.

 A judge fined him $500 plus court costs, and Cantwell also received a 90-day suspended jail sentence and five years’ probation.

 Cantwell’s attorney called the February incident at the Franklin County Jail a “prank.” It led Sheriff Jim Karnes to fire Cantwell and his partner in May. The other deputy was not charged with a crime.

 The inmates who were involved have filed lawsuits against the county.

 source: http://hosted.ap.org/dynamic/stories/U/US_ODD_DEPUTY_INMATES_SANDWICH?SITE=MTBIL&SECTION=HOME&TEMPLATE=DEFAULT

Ohio Deputy Charged with Perjury in Inmate’s Death Probe

A Summit County sheriff’s deputy is charged with felony perjury in connection with the case surrounding an inmate’s death.

A hearing held Wednesday found probable cause to charge 26-year-old Joshua Griffin, of Rootstown, with five counts of perjury and one misdemeanor count of falsification.

The charges relate to testimony Griffin gave in the investigation of Mark McCullaugh’s death.

McCullaugh was an inmate of the Summit County Jail when he died.

Griffin surrendered to authorities and was released on a $5,000 bond.

He has been placed on unpaid administrative leave by Sheriff Drew Alexander

source: http://www.officer.com/online/article.jsp?siteSection=1&id=48149

Corrections Officer and Two Inmates Charged

A Corrections Officer and two inmates face charges for attempting to bring about 200 grams of marijuana into the Warren Correctional Institute.
 
49 year-old Stephen Howard of Dayton and two inmates, Anthony Wells and Gregory Hollis, have been indicted for illegal conveyance of prohibited items onto grounds of detention facility.

source: http://www.local12.com/news/local/story/Corrections-Officer-and-Two-Inmates-Charged/1AUzXWbwsU2RojbMZQ7q0A.cspx?rss=30

Ohio Sheriff Accused Of Making False Statements Faces Jail Time

TOLEDO, Ohio — An Ohio sheriff has been charged with making false statements to FBI agents investigating the beating death of a man at a county jail.

 

Federal prosecutors said Lucas County Sheriff James Telb helped cover up the role that his deputies played in the 2004 death of Carleton Benton. A federal grand jury on Tuesday indicted Telb and three others.

 

The government said a sheriff’s deputy assaulted and strangled Benton in a cell, then left him lying unconscious without seeking medical help. The indictment said Benton was then struck by another deputy.

 

Telb and a lieutenant are accused of concealing their knowledge of the case from federal authorities.

 

Telb, who faces a maximum sentence of three years in prison if convicted, said he never interfered with the investigation.

source: http://www.newsnet5.com/news/19180902/detail.html

Ohio sheriff indicted in jail death

TOLEDO, Ohio (AP) – An Ohio sheriff has been charged with making false statements to FBI agents investigating the beating death of a man at a county jail.

Federal prosecutors say Lucas County Sheriff James Telb helped cover up the role that his deputies played in the 2004 death of Carleton Benton. A federal grand jury on Tuesday indicted Telb and three others.

The government says a sheriff’s deputy assaulted and strangled Benton in a cell, then left him lying unconscious without seeking medical help. The indictment says Benton was then struck by another deputy.

Telb and a lieutenant are accused of concealing their knowledge of the case from federal authorities.

Telb, who faces a maximum sentence of three years in prison if convicted, says he never interfered with the investigation.
source: http://www.local12.com/news/state/story/Ohio-sheriff-indicted-in-jail-death/dfum2JjeDE-fyxIcOlGKEw.cspx?rss=31

Corrections officer charged with sneaking dope into prison

A Warren Correctional Institution corrections officer from Dayton has been charged with attempting to sneak 200 grams of marijuana into the prison.

Stephen L. Howard, 49, appeared in Lebanon Municipal Court this week to face charges of attempting to convey drugs onto the grounds of a detention facility, a third-degree felony, and possession of criminal tools, a fifth-degree felony. Howard used hollowed-out markers and a Subway sandwich in an attempt to transport the marijuana from an outside dealer to an inmate, said Ohio State Highway Patrol Lt. Doug McKinney. Continue reading

Ex-corrections officer gets 4 years in prison

Seth Bunke, a former Lucas County corrections officer convicted of violating the civil rights of inmates, was sentenced Monday afternoon to a total of four years in prison.

bilde

 

He received two years on a felony charge and a year each for two misdemeanors by U.S. District Judge Jack Zouhary. The time in prison will include whatever mental health treatment is available.

Bunke, then of Jacksonville, N.C., was convicted in October of assaulting two inmates who were in custody at the jail and of portraying himself as a police officer when he stopped a driver he suspected of drunken driving.

He faced up to 12 years in prison.

Later Monday afternoon is the sentencing of a pair of men who pleaded guilty in November to misdemeanor charges of witness tampering in a case that involved Bunke.

source: http://www.toledoblade.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20090309/NEWS02/903090260/-1/RSS

Ex-corrections officer gets 4 years in prison

Seth Bunke, a former Lucas County corrections officer convicted of violating the civil rights of inmates, was sentenced Monday afternoon to a total of four years in prison.  

He received two years on a felony charge and a year each for two misdemeanors by U.S. District Judge Jack Zouhary. The time in prison will include whatever mental health treatment is available.

Bunke, then of Jacksonville, N.C., was convicted in October of assaulting two inmates who were in custody at the jail and of portraying himself as a police officer when he stopped a driver he suspected of drunken driving.

He faced up to 12 years in prison.

Former Lucas County corrections officer Seth Bunke is escorted from federal court in Toledo, Ohio, October 14, 2008. He was sentenced Monday to four years in prison.
Later Monday afternoon is the sentencing of a pair of men who pleaded guilty in November to misdemeanor charges of witness tampering in a case that involved Bunke.

source: http://www.toledoblade.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20090309/NEWS02/903090260/-1/RSS

Corrections officer charged with mishandling firearm

ZANESVILLE, Ohio — A city corrections officer has been charged with improper handling of a firearm in a motor vehicle following an Oct. 2 crash.

Eric B. Lambes, 23, son of Zanesville Police Chief Eric P. Lambes, was charged with the misdemeanor after Muskingum County Sheriff’s deputies found a .45 caliber handgun in his abandoned Nissan hatchback.

According to court documents, deputies were dispatched to an address on Old Coopermill Road on a report of a suspicious vehicle. There they found the car registered to the older Lambes and were told that two men fled the scene on foot following the wreck.

Deputies found the gun on the back floorboard of the vehicle, with a bullet loaded in the chamber and a spent shell casing on the floor. Chief Lambes told deputies at the scene that his son drives the car, but that he did not know where he was.

Deputies contacted the younger Lambes, who works at the Zanesville City Jail, that morning at his apartment. According to reports, he told a deputy he had been drinking the night before and did not clearly remember the crash. He said his friend had been driving and he did not know how the weapon ended up in the backseat. He also said that no one had been shooting the weapon that night.

Eric B. Lambes is scheduled for an arraignment hearing on Oct. 29 in Muskingum County Municipal Court.

source

http://www.dispatch.com/live/content/local_news/stories/2008/10/09/guncar.html?sid=101

Ex-Lucas County officer allegedly assaulted prisoners

His civil rights trial begins in U.S. court

Bunke


While a corrections officer at the Lucas County jail, Seth Bunke had authority over the inmates he supervised – a power federal prosecutors say he abused, but one that defense attorneys said was used appropriately when subduing angry prisoners. 

Mr. Bunke, 26, now of Jacksonville, N.C., faces five counts of deprivation of rights under the color of law for alleged assaults that occurred while he was employed by the Lucas County sheriff’s department. His trial, which is expected to last five days, began yesterday in U.S. District Court in Toledo. 

During a half-hour opening statement, Eric Gibson, an attorney with the U.S. Department of Justice’s Civil Rights Division, portrayed the 6-foot, 6-inch, 275-pound Mr. Bunke as a man who “abused his power and violated the rights of his fellow citizens.” 

He said that on four different occasions in 2007, while Mr. Bunke was employed at the jail, the former corrections officer assaulted inmates. In another incident, Mr. Bunke claimed to be a police officer when he pulled over two men he apparently suspected of drunken driving, Mr. Gibson said. 

“Seth Bunke did whatever he saw fit whenever he wanted,” Mr. Gibson said, adding it could be “stopping citizens on the street” or “brutalizing inmates.” 

Mr. Gibson outlined the various incidents that involved inmates detained in the jail but not yet found guilty of a crime. He labeled an incident July 11 as the “coup de grace,” saying Mr. Bunke repeatedly kicked inmate Jeff Jones in the head and side after an oral altercation that occurred while the prisoner was being strip-searched. 

Jones, who was incarcerated on a probation violation stemming from a drug charge, was hospitalized for several days afterward with a collapsed lung. He has since sued Mr. Bunke, the county, and the sheriff’s department. 

Mr. Bunke is also charged with civil rights violations for four other incidents – on March 10, May 5, May 6, and July 10. Mr. Gibson said in each case, Mr. Bunke aggressively attacked an inmate, which was not in accordance with his training. 

Defense attorney Rick Kerger told jurors during a half-hour opening statement the jail is a “hostile environment” where many of the inmates are angry. That anger, he said, comes back into the jail and onto the floors. 

“The guards, the corrections officers – they have to control them,” he said of unruly inmates. And to do that, all they have are “their hands and their feet.” 

Mr. Kerger said each of the incidents outlined in the indictment against Mr. Bunke were handled “by the book.” 

He said inmates are told they are to listen to orders given by staff and that corrections officers are told to discipline inmates in private so a prisoner is not tempted to “save face” and cause a disturbance. 

“That’s the environment there, and when you go into a module, you’re all alone,” he said. “You have to command the respect of inmates.” 

Mr. Gibson said Mr. Bunke’s aggressive behavior went outside the jail when, on March 13, 2007, he stopped two men who were driving home. Mr. Bunke allegedly showed the men his badge and uniform and detained them. 

“He claims to be an officer, which he is not,” Mr. Gibson said. 

Mr. Kerger acknowledged that Mr. Bunke detained two men he believed had been driving drunk. But he questioned whether Mr. Bunke would have faced charges if he had stopped a drunken driver. 

“Those folks were stopped for a period of time and they were found to be sober, fine,” he said. “What if they weren’t?” 

Mr. Bunke, a Marine Corps veteran who became known for his role in assisting rescued prisoner-of-war Army Pfc. Jessica Lynch in Iraq in 2003, resigned from the sheriff’s department in July, 2007, just days after the incident involving Jones. 

He has since moved to North Carolina but returned to Toledo in February when he was arrested. 

As a corrections officer, Mr. Bunke was paid a salary of $27,000. 

Charges are pending against two other men in connection with the July 11 incident involving Jones. 

Sheriff’s Deputy Joel McConnell, 28, and James Kotlarcyk, 44, a corrections officer, each face one count each of conspiracy and falsification of records for allegedly falsifying reports of the incident. Currently still employed at the sheriff’s department, Mr. Kotlarcyk and Deputy McConnell have a Dec. 9 trial date set. 

Mr. Bunke’s trial will resume today with Judge Jack Zouhary presiding. The jury of 11 women and three men will be taken to view the fifth floor of the jail, where Jones was allegedly assaulted, before the first witness testifies. Among those subpoenaed is Sheriff James Telb

source: . http://toledoblade.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20081008/NEWS02/810080374

 

Former Lucas County corrections officer found guilty of civil rights violations

A former Lucas County corrections officer was taken into custody Tuesday after a federal jury found him guilty of three civil rights violations.

Seth Bunke, 26, now of Jacksonville, N.C., was charged with five counts of deprivation of rights under the color of law after being accused of assaulting four inmates at the jail while he was an employee there and with portraying himself as a police officer when he stopped a driver he suspected of drunken driving.

The trial in U.S. District Court in Toledo lasted five days.

The jury of 10 women and two men found him not guilty of two of the charges involving inmates at the jail. He was found guilty of incidents that occurred on May 6, 2007, and July 11, 2007, as well as detaining a driver and his passenger on March 13, 2007.

Two of the charges Bunke was found guilty of carry a maximum penalty of up to one year in prison each. The third charge, involving inmate Jeffery Jones, carries a maximum of up to 10 years in prison.

A sentencing date has not yet been set. Judge Jack Zouhary ordered Bunke into custody after the verdicts were read, asking that he not be housed in the Lucas County jail.

Defense attorney Rick Kerger said Bunke will be housed in the federal prison in Milan, Mich., until he is sentenced. Mr. Kerger added that he will be filing a motion for a new trial on the count involving Jones.

In that case, federal prosecutors said Bunke repeatedly kicked inmate Jones in the head and side after a verbal altercation that occurred while the prisoner was being strip searched.

Jones, who was incarcerated on a probation violation on an original drug charge, was hospitalized for several days after the incident with a collapsed lung. He has since sued Bunke, the county, and the sheriff’s department.

The jury deliberated for about 2 ½ hours before reaching a verdict.

source

http://www.toledoblade.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20081014/NEWS02/810140250/-1/RSS

Corrections officer on trial for civil rights violations

TOLEDO — On Tuesday, the Federal trial begins for a former Lucas County Corrections officer charged with civil rights and conspiracy violations.

Seth Bunke, 25, is accused of repeatedly kicking an inmate in the side of the head in July 2007.

The former officer is also charged in four other incidents where inmates were either seized or assaulted.

Bunke is a Marine Corps veteran who was hailed as a hero after assisting in the rescue of POW Jessica Lynch in Iraq.

source

http://www.wnwo.com/news/story.aspx?id=202974

Jail Guard Arrested

Another corrections officer at the Columbiana County Jail, Is charged with providing contraband to inmates.  Nathaniel Barnes of Youngstown, is charged with smuggling marijuana and cigarette tobacco into the facility.  It’s actually the second time in less than a year that a corrections officer has been charged with similar crimes. Task force officials say this most recent arrest was part of an ongoing investigation that came after agents learned one or more corrections officers may have been involved in the scheme.

source

http://www.wkbn.com/news/local/13956072.html

Former Kenton Co. Jail Guard Avoids Jail Time

Last Update: 6:43 pm

Web produced by: Carole Rawlins and Ian Preuth

A
former Kenton County jail guard will not have to spend time in jail
after pleading guilty to impersonating an officer, unlawful
imprisonment and terroristic threatening.

A judge ordered Melanie Murray to complete a three-year felony diversion program and pay a $250 fine.

Prosecutors
say Murray had just started working at the jail, but had not finished
training, when she handcuffed a man inside the Strauss Haus Bar on Main
Street in Covington April 6.

Officers say she took the man
outside into an alley, then started vomiting. While she was getting
sick, the victim found the handcuff key and freed himself. He then
called police, who found her passed out in the alley.

Police say
when paramedics arrived, Murray became combative and belligerent. Then
once under arrest, officers say she threatened to kill them.

Because of her plea, she is longer allowed to work in law enforcement.

source:

http://www.wcpo.com/news/local/story.aspx?content_id=d4061f0d-b46d-49f6-bb96-8f21feb03ce1&rss=703

Detention Officer Shoots Own Leg

A Campbell County Detention Officer shot himself in the leg Wednesday afternoon after a practice session on the firing range.

Multiple police sources confirm the incident which happened at the firing range inside the Highland Heights Police Department.

Law enforcement agencies in Northern Kentucky use the range for training.

Sergeant Jason Perry, with Campbell County Central Fire Department on authorization from his chief, confirmed that they picked up the officer and transported him to University Hospital in Cincinnati.

The wound is described as superficial.

Reports say the officer was holstering his weapon but still had his finger on the trigger.

The weapon went off and the round hit his leg.

An after-hours phone call to Detention Center spokesman Colonel Jim Dailey wasn’t immediately returned.

source: http://www.wcpo.com/news/local/story.aspx?content_id=d050227e-4323-4729-bc6b-f9904ebae9db&rss=742

Deputy’s trial to begin in inmate’s jail death

Prosecutors plan to use 90 photos from autopsy depicting injuries

In September 2006, barely a month after the death of Summit County Jail inmate Mark D. McCullaugh Jr., his father talked about the hardships of the funeral.

McCullaugh, 28, was so badly beaten in the face and other areas of the head, his father said, the casket had to be closed.

Now, nearly two years later, court records show that prosecutors plan to use 90 autopsy photographs — depicting external and internal views of numerous injuries to the upper and lower body — when they take the first of five sheriff’s deputies to trial for McCullaugh’s death.

Among those injuries, according to court records filed in May, were seven fractured ribs incurred during a violent struggle with the deputies in McCullaugh’s cell in the jail’s mental-health unit on Aug. 20, 2006.

The trial of deputy Stephen Krendick, 35, is set to begin Monday morning in Summit County Common Pleas Court before visiting Judge Herman F. Inderlied Jr. of Geauga County.

Krendick, who waived his right to a jury trial, faces the most serious charge in the deadly incident — one count of murder. If convicted, he could be sent to prison for 15 years to life.

He has pleaded not guilty in various court proceedings since his Sept. 7 indictment and is free on bond. Last month, Krendick
had his pay reinstated by Summit County Sheriff Drew Alexander.

The other deputies who were indicted — Brett Hadley, Brian Polinger, Dominic Martucci and Mark Mayer — are scheduled to go to trial before Inderlied later this year.

Defense experts

In an apparent attempt to counter the autopsy evidence in the government’s case, Krendick’s lawyers, Robert C. Baker of Akron and James M. Kersey of Cleveland, said in their trial brief that six medical experts will testify that the deputies were not at fault in McCullaugh’s death.

”The events which led to Mr. McCullaugh’s death were set in motion, not by Stephen Krendick and any of the other deputies, but by Mark McCullaugh,” the defense records say.

McCullaugh, 6-foot-2 and 306 pounds, according to autopsy evidence, died from sudden heart failure brought on by excited delirium from a psychotic condition for which he was no longer being treated, the defense contends.

One of the defense experts, renowned forensic pathologist Werner U. Spitz, will testify that McCullaugh ”died of a haywire heartbeat triggered by stress and agitation brought on by his psychotic condition, and further, that his heart could not stand the workload,” the records say.

Spitz, former chief medical examiner of Wayne and Macomb counties in Michigan and a professor of pathology at Wayne State University in Detroit, testified in the O.J. Simpson wrongful death trial and at congressional investigations into the assassinations of President John F. Kennedy and Martin Luther King Jr.

Prosecutors’ exhibits

In all, prosecutors documented 215 exhibits of potential evidence against Krendick in their 33-page trial brief.

Those exhibits will show there was a violent struggle with the deputies in McCullaugh’s cell, and that during the struggle, the prosecution brief alleges, McCullaugh was beaten, stomped, kicked, placed in handcuffs and leg shackles in a ”hog-tying” position and then shot by Krendick with a Taser stun gun.

”Even after participating in the forceful restraint and hog-tying of McCullaugh, and after leaving the cell for between . . . 25 and 30 minutes, Krendick continued his assault on McCullaugh,” the trial brief says.

”Returning to the cell and finding McCullaugh subdued,” the brief says, ”Krendick expressed a desire to apply [pepper spray] to the prisoner.”

Krendick then sprayed an entire 16-ounce can of pepper spray ”across McCullaugh’s buttocks, back and back of his head,” the trial brief says.

After McCullaugh was shackled — but before being pepper-sprayed — those records also indicate that he was injected by a jail nurse with what was described as a ”two-drug cocktail” in a further effort to calm him down.

McCullaugh was pronounced dead at 7:46 that night at Akron General Medical Center.

Report challenged

Initially, Summit County Medical Examiner Lisa J. Kohler ruled the death a homicide.

That ruling was based on the autopsy findings of her chief assistant, forensic pathologist George Sterbenz, who determined that the cause of death was asphyxiation from multiple forms of restraint and blunt-force blows, including an unspecified anal injury.

But in a May 2 Summit County civil court ruling, visiting Judge Ted Schneiderman ordered Kohler to change the manner of death in McCullaugh’s autopsy report from ”homicide” to ”undetermined.”

Schneiderman’s order followed a four-day trial in which Kohler’s report was challenged by lawyers from Taser International Inc. and the city of Akron.

There was ”simply no medical, scientific or electrical evidence to support the conclusion that the Taser . . . . . . had anything to do” with McCullaugh’s death or with two other unrelated deaths involving confrontations with area police, Schneiderman said in his order.

Krendick’s lawyers subsequently filed a motion to dismiss the charges against all of the deputies, contending that Schneiderman’s ruling tainted the original evidence on which the grand jury indictments were based.

But Inderlied denied that motion, saying the indictments were ”not evidence” and ”nothing more than a charging document.”

Other testimony

University of Akron law professor J. Dean Carro, president of the Akron Bar Association, said the prosecution’s case for proving murder without an official finding of homicide is not necessarily more difficult.

”You can prove causation with other information,” Carro said. ”You don’t have to rely solely on the autopsy report.”

In what might be the most damaging evidence against Krendick, case records show, the prosecution will offer testimony from other deputies who told investigators they saw Krendick ”standing on the bunk stomping on McCullaugh’s head with his boot.”

One of those deputies, Keith Murray, ”said that Krendick stomped on McCullaugh’s head five or six times.”

Nevertheless, prosecutors said in their trial brief that, if they are unable to prove beyond a reasonable doubt that Krendick is guilty of murder, lesser charges of involuntary manslaughter and aggravated assault warrant consideration by the judge.

”What the state is saying there is: ‘We don’t know what the evidence is absolutely going to turn out to be,’ ” Carro said. ”The facts drive whether you get the lesser [charges] included.”

Assistant Cuyahoga County prosecutors John R. Kosko and Brian M. McDonough, who were appointed as special prosecutors, will handle the government’s case.

Summit County Prosecutor Sherri Bevan Walsh asked Cuyahoga County to take the case last year to avoid possible conflicts of interest.
source: http://www.ohio.com/news/25954554.html?page=3&c=y

Sedg. Co. Jail Deputy Charged With Battery on inmate.

 

Manual Diaz, Jr.
Manual Diaz, Jr.
Edgar Richards
Edgar Richards

 

The District Attorney charges a Sedgwick County Jail Deputy Wednesday, accused of beating a jail inmate so badly he has to go through rehab.

Manual Diaz Jr. is charged aggravated battery.  When the incident happened back in February, sheriff’s deputies said Diaz was trying to give the inmate his medication when things got out of control.

Diaz is accused of hurting 34 year old Edgar Richard, who spent weeks in the hospital with a broken jaw and a skull fracture.

We spoke with Richard’s family 5 months ago. They say Richard suffers from mental illness.  But they also told us they want the man they believe put Edgar on a breathing machine brought to justice.

“I’d like the officer or whoever done it to pay for what he done,” said Ronnie Richard.

Cynthia Richard continued, “I think he should be held accountable. He committed a crime. He went over and beyond his job. He ended up doing his job and at some point it went personal because it never stopped.”

The Sedgwick County Sheriff’s Office said Deputy Diaz is now on paid suspension. In the next two weeks, the Sheriff’s Office will decide whether to fire him with an employee status meeting.

Last month a judge agreed to release Richard to a nursing home.  His family says he has to relearn how to eat and needs rehab.

As for the deputy, he goes back to court for his preliminary hearing July 16th.

source: http://www.kwch.com/global/story.asp?s=8420414

Former CCI worker faces sex charges

Case involves inappropriate behavior with an inmate

A former case worker at the Chillicothe Correctional Institution faces a pretrial hearing on sex-related charges.

Larry L. Grant Jr., 40, of 472 Chestnut St., faces three counts of sexual battery, a third-degree felony, involving an inmate at CCI. Grant also formerly worked for the Ross County Sheriff’s Office and the Adult Parole Authority.

The June 27 session of the grand jury issued the indictment, and Grant was arrested last weekend. He pleaded not guilty to the charges Monday and was released on his own recognizance by Common Pleas Judge Scott Nusbaum – with the stipulation he have no contact with the alleged victim.

Prosecutor Mike Ater would not go into details concerning the involvement, but said the case centers around Grant having an inappropriate relationship with the inmate. Ater said his office became aware of the incident around June 10, when a lawyer representing the victim contacted him to report the incident.

“We were able to determine three separate incidents of inappropriateness that Grant had with the inmate,” he said.

Grant resigned from CCI June 18 in the wake up the investigation after working there for two years.

“He did not have any active disciplinary actions in his file,” Leta Pritchard, administrative assistant to the warden at CCI said.

Prior to working at the prison, Grant worked for the Adult Parole Authority from 1999 to 2006. He also was employed with the Ross County Sheriff’s Office from 1991 to 1999, where he worked as a corrections officer, then moved to road officer.

source: http://www.chillicothegazette.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20080704/NEWS01/807040303/1002

Lucas County Sheriff’s office charges officer arrested for drugs

A Lucas County corrections officer arrested June 18 after authorities said they found cocaine in his South Toledo house has been charged administratively by the sheriff’s office, authorities said.

Thomas Walker, 24, of 1843 Airport Hwy. was charged by internal affairs investigators with dishonesty, truthfulness, associating/consorting, and conduct unbecoming of an officer. He has been on paid administrative leave since his arrest, authorities said.

Mr. Walker pleaded not guilty during his arraignment June 19 in Toledo Municipal Court to a misdemeanor charge of permitting drug abuse. He is free on a $500 bond. 

Authorities found cocaine in his residence after they served a search warrant about 6:20 p.m., court records show.

Mr. Walker has worked for the sheriff’s office for two years and had a clean disciplinary history, authorities said.

source: http://www.toledoblade.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20080702/NEWS03/744745174/-1/RSS

 

Steroids Found At Correctional Officer’s Apartment

MIDDLETOWN — A Middletown correctional officer was charged with four counts of steroid abuse after police found steroids in his apartment and is being held on 10 percent of a $13,500 bond in jail.

Billy J. Hatfield, 33, was arrested at the time on two outstanding warrants for failing to appear on traffic citations in Montgomery County. He is at the Middletown City Jail.

Middletown police found seven vials of anabolic steroid and 16 packs of anabolic steroid tablets on Jan. 25 while conducting a welfare check on Hatfield’s spouse at the couple’s apartment, according to the police report.

Hatfield is believed to still work at the Lebanon Correctional Institution, though the prison does require any employee who gets arrested to tell their immediate supervisor.

 Ellen Myers, the warden’s assistant at Lebanon Correctional said, “This is the first we’ve heard about it. To the best of my knowledge, he is still employed here.” She said there is a correctional officer at the prison named Billy Hatfield, but added that she was unable to confirm that it was the same man.

 The warden would then make the determination about any disciplinary action needed based on the individual circumstances of the arrest.

Police had to wait to assess the charges because state law requires an exact chemical match to be found before charging the suspect.

source: http://www.wlwt.com/news/16585405/detail.html